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"America has two great dominant strands of political thought - conservatism, which, at its very best, draws lines that should not be crossed; and progressivism, which, at its very best, breaks down barriers that should never have been erected." -- Bill Clinton, Dedication of the Clinton Presidential Library, November 2004

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Thursday, January 15, 2004

 

On the Cover of the Rolling Stone http://www.rollingstone.com/features/nationalaffairs/featuregen.asp?pid=2760

posted by Dana at Thursday, January 15, 2004 permalink View blog reactions
Howard Dean is at his best one-one-one.

He seems to relax. His humanity and decency come through. He's articulate, smart, down-to-Earth. I think a lot of campaigns wish their candidates were this easy-going.

A few highlights from the Rolling Stone interview (but please read the whole thing):


You've really been getting attacked by your opponents out there on the campaign trail -- how does it make you feel?

Interestingly enough, I personalize things less now than I did when I was governor, in terms of attacks from other opponents and so forth. A lot of these attacks come across as personal, but they are mostly theater. But when they first started going after me, I couldn't believe it, because I knew a lot of those guys.



I like that concept, "they are mostly theater." Shows a great appreciation for the reality of politics. There's a bit more online, but at the bottom you will note these are "excerpts," so buy the magazine and let us know what you think.

That humanity also comes out from both the Doctors Dean in their joint interview with People.



Q: You've mentioned that you don't give him advice on politics or policy because it's not really where your interest is. Are there any issues that you feel passionate about that you do weigh in on — whether it's the environment or health care or any policy things at all?

Judy: I have my opinions on health care from my point of view, and he probably knows what they are because we talk about them. But it's not really giving advice. So I would say no, I don't really give advice.

Howard: Judy sort of functions as my Person-in-the-Street. The best kind of advice she gives me is, "You look like an idiot on television." She wouldn't say it that way, but, "You didn't do very well on television"' I'll never forget the first time we went to a speech that I was giving on a subject I knew not much about. And on the way home, I said, "Well, how did you think I did?" and she said, "Fair to poor, with the emphasis on poor," which, I had to admit, was probably exactly right.



Again, read the whole thing. I think they're good people.




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Nation-Building was founded by Aziz Poonawalla in August 2002 under the name Dean Nation. Dean Nation was the very first weblog devoted to a presidential candidate, Howard Dean, and became the vanguard of the Dean netroot phenomenon, raising over $40,000 for the Dean campaign, pioneering the use of Meetup, and enjoying the attention of the campaign itself, with Joe Trippi a regular reader (and sometime commentor). Howard Dean himself even left a comment once. Dean Nation was a group weblog effort and counts among its alumni many of the progressive blogsphere's leading talent including Jerome Armstrong, Matthew Yglesias, and Ezra Klein. After the election in 2004, the blog refocused onto the theme of "purple politics", formally changing its name to Nation-Building in June 2006. The primary focus of the blog is on articulating purple-state policy at home and pragmatic liberal interventionism abroad.