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"America has two great dominant strands of political thought - conservatism, which, at its very best, draws lines that should not be crossed; and progressivism, which, at its very best, breaks down barriers that should never have been erected." -- Bill Clinton, Dedication of the Clinton Presidential Library, November 2004

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Monday, April 28, 2003

 

Dean Defense Forces: Call to Action http://www.johnkerry.net/contact/

posted by Matt Singer at Monday, April 28, 2003 permalink View blog reactions
(Before I begin, let me say that this is just my post, wasn't asked for by the campaign, by Aziz or anyone else.)

I just came across the CNN story on the fight that Lehane started and is deciding to continue:

Dean campaign manager Joe Trippi responded with his own written statement, calling Lehane's comments absurd. Trippi said Dean would never tolerate an erosion of American military power, but the war on terrorism cannot be won by relying solely on military power and must include diplomacy.

"Governor Dean believes that even the most sophisticated military in the world acting alone cannot eliminate all sleeper terrorist cells, nor should it be called upon to take on every dictator for the purpose of regime change," Trippi said.

Trippi said if Kerry supports Bush's approach to foreign policy "then John Kerry is running for the nomination of the wrong party, because the Bush doctrine of pre-emptive war must stop here."

Lehane said the Trippi statement is a "non-answer response (that) doesn't explain the unexplainable or defend the indefensible, his statement in Time Magazine that America wouldn't always have the strongest military."

[...]

In an interview, Trippi criticized Kerry for sending "his boys out" to criticize Dean instead of answering questions about his own position.

"This is crass politics," he said. "This is an important debate about what kind of country we are going to be in the international community and there is no serious candidate running for president of the United States who doesn't believe in maintaining America's military strength in the world. John Kerry knows that, his campaign knows that."

Did Lehane actually just say that Trippi's answer couldn't explain the unexplainable or defend the indefensible? I think he did.

And I think it's time we gave the Kerry campaign a piece of our mind. We're Democrats. We're all Democrats. And it's one thing to have policy disagreements. If Kerry disagrees with Dean's stance, he can disagree, but let them know that you will not stand to see Dean's words twisted by a man running to represent us.

You can e-mail

info@johnkerry.com

or go here.

Title your message "Stop Misrepresenting Dean" or something similar so they know that lots of people are a little less than happy with their actions.


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About Nation-Building

Nation-Building was founded by Aziz Poonawalla in August 2002 under the name Dean Nation. Dean Nation was the very first weblog devoted to a presidential candidate, Howard Dean, and became the vanguard of the Dean netroot phenomenon, raising over $40,000 for the Dean campaign, pioneering the use of Meetup, and enjoying the attention of the campaign itself, with Joe Trippi a regular reader (and sometime commentor). Howard Dean himself even left a comment once. Dean Nation was a group weblog effort and counts among its alumni many of the progressive blogsphere's leading talent including Jerome Armstrong, Matthew Yglesias, and Ezra Klein. After the election in 2004, the blog refocused onto the theme of "purple politics", formally changing its name to Nation-Building in June 2006. The primary focus of the blog is on articulating purple-state policy at home and pragmatic liberal interventionism abroad.